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20110704
20110704
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
old and treating american soldiers in afghanistan. mandy clark will have his story. >> this is the captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. nearly two months after her trial began the case of casey anthony is et is to be in the hands of the jury tomorrow. closing arguments took place today and anthony, a 25-year-old single mother accused of killing her two-year-old daughter three years ago could face the death penalty if convicted. cbs news "48 hours" mystery correspondent troy roberts has been covering the case and has the latest. >> reporter: for three years casey anthony has fought the notion that she killed her own child caylee. >> mama, papa. >> reporter: in 2008 caylee was a spirited two-year-old girl. then a missing person. and a murder victim. casey was her 22-year-old single mom who raised caylee with her grandparents cindy and george, all living together under one roof. but in june 2008 casey abruptly left home with caylee. the family did not see caylee for a month. >> i found out my gran
for the freedoms we all enjoy. they include, of course, those who have died in iraq and afghanistan. in tonight's "making a difference" report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars, and have joined forces now to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> ready, set, go! >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own heal
about afghanistan and what it calls men and women to serve and what they do so. let's look at this story. the deficit battle is favoring the gop. we will see house some of this plays out this week. : is thetion today is constitution still relevant? now to the democratic line with lawrence from new jersey. welcome. caller: thanks for taking my call. >> is the constitution still relevant? i don't think it does. most americans don't know anything about the treaty of kent. it says to return things to the way they were before. we established the federal government, the irs, and federal income-tax. anniversary ofe 2 the signing of this treaty. rights will be taken away. host: here's a comment from twitter. here's another comment on twitter. let's take a look at some final numbers. this is from culpeper, virginia. thanks for all your calls this morning. we will be back in a few moments talking about topics ranging from white people serve in the military to what americans think about patriotism. we will be right back. >> ♪ >> today on c-span, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non-v
troops on the fourth of july. we'll go live to afghanistan to see what our troops are thinking about this fourth of july so far from home. >>> she's just been named military spouse of the year. that's saying a lot. we'll talk to her live right after the break. >>> this is cw2 christopher holaday from washington. say hi to my family. an accident doesn't have to slow you down. with better car replacement available only with liberty mutual auto insurance, if your car's totaled, we give you the money for a car one model year newer. to learn more, visit us today. responsibility. what's your policy? ♪ you are my sunshine ♪ my only sunshine ♪ you makes me happy ♪ when skies are grey ♪ you'll never know, dear ♪ how much i love you ♪ please don't take my sunshine away ♪ [ male announcer ] as long as there are babies, they'll be chevy's to bring them home. ♪ is actually finding choices the whole family will love. five flavors of chex are gluten-free, including the honey nut flavor. and it's nice for me to be able to say "yes" to something that they want to eat. [ male announc
airborne division which is located along the afghanistan border with pakistan. then a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign with a focus on the grounds an early primary states as well as the republican presidential field. >> today, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non violence. they spoke to more than 10,000 people at the university of arkansas discussing osama bin laden's death, the nuremberg trials, the execution of saddam hussein, and the death penalty. >> in the 20th-century, the number of people were killed and three violence, over 200 million. that problem must be solved. there is also exploitation and we should lay down the seat of hatred course watched this discussion this evening at 6:30 on c-span. what's it look back at president nixon's foreign-policy. members of his administration and his son-in-law discussed topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam and the war in the middle east. >> the discussion in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day camp
with men's health magazine, iraq, afghanistan many times and i run into the msg's, the legacy of the msg's guarding consulates and imbaa sighs all around the world, and frankly, i'm not worried about kabul and baghdad. i'm been to chad and darfur and tashkent and liberia, and these kids that are over there, and they are kids. they are kids today like they were kids back then. these kids over there that are kind of guarding, not kind of, guarding the embassies, no matter how you feel, and i don't want to know about our military ventures overseas. they are the best trained marines, the most dedicated marines, and just like the marines, the heroic marines, i think, they will never say it, but just like the heroic marines from saigon in 1975, that legacy continues in the msg, the marine security guard units, and i don't know how you feel about overseas ventures, but it's something we can all be proud of, and i am. >> hoorah. >> you know i told you about the guy who lived up the street, steve, he took that bayonet and wouldn't leave, and you know, says it's nothing. you can give him a hand, h
at military bases worldwide from iraq to afghanistan to guantanamo bay. most often, he travels with his group, which you have heard about. the cookies on the table are a tribute to that. they are the focus of a feature-length documentary that chronicles the band travels to entertain the troops. they have a website. they are doing a launch very soon where people can watch that. kfar the proceeds will benefit the gary sinise foundation. while dismissing the speculation that he is running for political office -- [laughter] but we might follow up on that today. our guest has been an outspoken critic of bureaucracy and red tape that often delays and prevents service members and veterans from getting care and benefits. he has said the nation is not doing enough to help disabled veterans and u.s. troops wounded in iraq and afghanistan. he has called on the government to -- and the private sector to spend more on victims of posttraumatic stress disorder and get them some help. he is a star who moonlights as a soldier's advocate. our speaker has questioned his own industry at times while producing fil
's afghanistan farm, and that's where they practiced how to possibly assassinate him without collateral damage. this is before 9/11, but at the end of the experiment, the state department got involved, and there was lots of legalities about assassinating someone, so they decided not to do it. >> how could area 51 secrets be kept from american presidents? >> that's a very tricky and uncomfortable question certainly for this journalist, but in the very beginning of the book i explain to you that something that i found really pretty shocking when i learned it in researching this book that the atomic energy commission actually has a system of secret keeping that runs parallel to the president's system of secret keeping which is the national security system. that is not the way the constitution was written, but it is what the atomic energy act of 1946 allowed, so when the charter was written right after world war ii for the atomic energy commission, they created the system of secret keeping which the slang for it is called born classified. scholars who looked into this secret keeping system say tha
. >> you have a brother in afghanistan you wish could be here today? i know what that's like -- jessic car, when you see your brother -- >> okay, open your eyes. >> daddy! [ screaming ] >> daddy! >> what's up, buddy? [ screaming ] >> hey, dad. >> oh, my god! oh, my lord! >> how are you doing? happy birthday. >> oh, lord! mine was earned over the south pacific in 1943. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, because it offers a superior level of protection and because u.s.a.a.'s commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. u.s.a.a. we know what it means to serve. sure, but let me get a little information first. for broccoli, say one. for toys, say two. toys ! the system can't process your response at this time. what ? please call back between 8 and 5 central standard time. he's in control. goodbye. even kids know it's wrong to give someone the run around. at ally bank you never have to deal with an endless automated system. you can
-- vietnam, iraq, afghanistan -- is that they are fought mostly by the poor. there are very, very few among the dead and wounded in the those three wars who have been sons or daughters of ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite in the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the air strock rah si to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries, they're there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army, you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland. and so, therefore, officering the army was something that was generally reserved for people in the upper classes. this meant that when these countries went to war in 1914, these upper classes suffered an enormous toll. for examp
in afghanistan for a missing british soldier. officials say he disappeared in the southern part of the country. the taliban claim that is they captured and executed an american soldier yesterday. that has not been verified. >>> new clashes in syria this morning, soldiers and tanks have moved into towns near the border with turkey and storm houses in hama as thousands people took part in prodemocracy demonstrations. at least six people were wounded in the latest military maneuver. >>> prosecutors in new york say they are not dropping the sexual assault case against dominique strauss-kahn. not yet, at least. he and his wife were mobbed by the media after they left their manhattan apartment on saturday. former head of the imf was released from house arrest after prosecutors said his accuser has a history of lying. >>> a poll conducted for this july 4th holiday shows a surprising number of americans know very little about it. just 58% of those surveyed knew america declared independence in 1776. 26% were unsure. 16% guessed another year. 76% correctly said we declared independence from britain but
corner of afghanistan. they took part in a flag-raising ceremony complete with a military band to observe the fourth of july holiday, independence day. very nice. >>> taking a look at your all-important weather, this becomes very important. we have barbecues to talk about. can't have rain on the barbecue. severe storms are possible in the dakotas and parts of minnesota. there also could be flooding rains in missouri, maryland, and arkansas. firefighters in the desert southwest could get some help from monsoon rains. it always rained in seattle when i was growing up on the fourth. >> we should say folks in texas, it's very dry, looking for some rain. in colorado, northern texas, 10 degrees warmer than usual. seattle, seasonable in the mid-70s. chicago, detroit, minneapolis, mid-80s. i can deal with that. >> that sounds pretty good. >>> the calendar says it is the 4th but the scene on washington state's crystal mountain is confusing because record snowfall has extended the skiing and snowboarding season. >> hundreds of people are expected to hit the slopes over the holiday weekend. it's a s
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)